by Ashley Smith, Scribe Contributor

Happy Vernal Equinox, otherwise known as the first day of spring!

Throughout the year, day and night compete for time. Day dominates in the summer, night in the winter. However, twice a year during the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, day and night call a truce: for twenty-four hours they allow each other to reign for roughly the same length of time.

Similarly, our brains have two sides that sometimes seem to compete for dominance. The right hemisphere is the creative or fantasy-based side.  It presents possibilities and interprets aesthetics and feelings. The left hemisphere is the logical or reality-based side. It forms strategies and interprets facts and details.

But whether you consider yourself a predominantly left-brained or right-brained thinker, when it comes to analyzing the value and desire of a product or service, chances are you engage both sides of the brain almost equally.

This is an important consideration when thinking about how to communicate with your target customers. Whether your business offers something practical or whimsical, you want to appeal to both sides of the brain when writing content for your newsletters, ads, and website.

When writing for the right brain:

  • Describe how the customer would feel using your product or service. Think of how smooth and supple skin feels after using a certain skin care product or the sense of well-being felt after a yoga session.
  • Predict the outcome the customer would gain. Using skin care products prevents dry skin, oiliness, wrinkles, etc. Doing yoga promotes flexibility, better posture, stronger muscles, etc.
  • Use words that connect the customer to the product or service. “Your skin will love you for using it!” “Treat your mind and body to the healing power of yoga.”

 

When writing for the left brain:

  • State tangible results. “Dry, cracked skin disappears within three weeks.” “After three months of twice-weekly yoga sessions, you will see a significant increase in flexibility and strength.”
  • Offer price options. Customers will often buy more of something in order to get a bigger discount. “Buy three bottles of lotion for the price of two!” “Take 1 yoga session today for $15, or register for 4 classes for $50.”

 

Although your content and copy should ideally appeal to both sides of the brain, you also want to consider your target audience. Is cost or aesthetics more important to them? Will they use your product or service for practical reasons or for pure pleasure? Decide which side of the brain your audience will be predominantly using while engaging with your business, and focus more of your energy on appealing to that side. But don’t forget to leave some room for the other side of the appeal as well.

Can you think of other ways to appeal to both sides of a customer’s brain? Leave us your ideas in the comments below.